Why growth is important

Photo by Jen Theodore on Unsplash

Change is overrated. Everyone keeps on talking about it. Books have been written about its importance. Articles and blogs are everywhere constantly reminding us that one can never stay in one place (literally and metaphorically.) That for us to grow we need to change.

But then there is the comfort zone — everyone’s favorite corner.

The comfort zone is a very safe place. Free from inconveniences, challenges, and discomfort. You can just bask in its comfort and convenience but one cannot stay for too long. Not when personal growth and self-actualization is at stake.

The comfort zone can be anything to anyone. For me it is my current company.

I enjoy staying in my comfort zone much because of its familiarity. My mind is at ease knowing that I’ll be doing the same thing, with the same people and dynamics day in and day out. I mean, I got so much in my mind lately and looking for a new job is something I don’t want to think about right now.

I have stayed quite longer than I’ve should. I planned out on looking for greener pastures many times before but ended up staying.

The luxury of being able to chill and relax is difficult to let go. Many people would kill to be in my position right now (or so I thought.)

I am content with the way things are that I don’t want to shake things up.

Also, because of the following reasons:

  • The feeling of starting from scratch scares me.
  • The tingling sensation of fear creeping in because I will need to market myself yet again and pitch myself to companies as to why they need to hire me is just unbearable. (I’m an introvert by the way.)
  • The anxiety of being rejected by companies for not qualifying for their requirements is a nightmare I would not like to be in.
  • The fear of failing pre-employment examinations and interviews because it would just confirm that I haven’t learned enough or that I’m not skilled enough to work for a new company.
  • That my professional experience isn’t “professional” enough.
  • The inconvenience brought by meeting new people and having to build new relationships.
  • The tedious task of complying requirements — going from one place to another is not only physically draining but mentally taxing.
  • And the financial responsibilities I have for myself and my family.

But why do we need to break out of that bubble?

Why do we need to allow ourselves the possibilities of rejection, failure, and all the things that go with it when we can just sit back and allow life to happen in front of us while we enjoy the stagnancy of the status quo where we are in?

Because we need to change. I know, it’s really overrated. But it is necessary.

We need to change because it forces us to grow.

Growth allows us to break through our status quo into the next level. Growth means becoming better at something and most importantly becoming a better person. Growth gives purpose to everything we do: that weekly training you do for the marathon you’re participating in, the many sleepless nights you devote to honing your writing skills, and the many times that you did not get back at people who hurt you because you want to become a better person.

Growth makes life worth-living.

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Tobby Manongsong

Tobby Manongsong

I write stuff.

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